the Unabomber

 

read the Ted Kaczynski file. Doing so will provide solid background information on the Unabomber. Normally it is unacceptable to use Wikipedia as a source of information, but in this case it is fine to do so.
2- The following link deals with the the “Unabomber Manifesto.” This part of the assignment involves only the following two short sections: “Introduction” (Sections 1-5) and “The Bad Parts of only Technology can’t be separated from the Good Parts” (Sections 121-124).

http://cyber.eserver.org/unabom.txt

3- When you have done as requested, using your very best critical thinking skills, respond to Mr. Kaczynski’s assertion in the first sentence of the “Introduction” that “The Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race.” Be sure to support with specific examples whatever position you take in responding to his remarks.
Ted Kaczynski
Theodore John “Ted” Kaczynski ( /k?’z?nski/ka-ZIN-skee, or ka-CHIN-skee; Polish: Kaczynski, pronounced [ka’t????~sk?i]; born May 22, 1942), also known as the “Unabomber”, is an American murderer, mathematician, social critic, anarchist, and Neo-Luddite.[2] Between 1978 and 1995, Kaczynski engaged in a nation-wide bombing campaign against modern technology, planting or mailing numerous home-made bombs, killing three people and injuring 23 others.
Kaczynski was born in Chicago, Illinois, where, as a child prodigy, he excelled academically from an early age. Kaczynski was accepted into Harvard University at the age of 16, where he earned an undergraduate degree, and later earned a PhD in mathematics from the University of Michigan. He became an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley at age 25, but resigned two years later.
In 1971, he moved to a remote cabin without electricity or running water, in Lincoln, Montana, where he lived as a recluse while learning survival skills in an attempt to become self-sufficient.[3] He decided to start a bombing campaign after watching the wilderness around his home being destroyed by development, according to Kaczynski.[3] From 1978 to 1995, Kaczynski sent 16 bombs to targets including universities and airlines, killing three people and injuring 23. Kaczynski sent a letter to The New York Times on April 24, 1995 and promised “to desist from terrorism” if the Times or the Washington Post published his manifesto, Industrial Society and Its Future (also called the “Unabomber Manifesto”), in which he argued that his bombings were extreme but necessary to attract attention to the erosion of human freedom necessitated by modern technologies requiring large-scale organization.
The Unabomber was the target of one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s costliest investigations. Before Kaczynski’s identity was known, the FBI used the title “UNABOM” (UNiversity& Airline BOMber) to refer to his case, which resulted in the media calling him the Unabomber. The FBI pushed for the publication of Kaczynski’s “Manifesto” which led to his brother and his wife recognizing Kaczynski’s style of writing and beliefs from the manifesto, and tipping off the FBI.[4] Kaczynski tried unsuccessfully to dismiss his court appointed lawyers because they wanted to plead insanity in order to avoid the death penalty, as Kaczynski did not believe he was insane.[5] When it became clear that his pending trial would entail national television exposure for Kaczynski, the court entered a plea agreement, under which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. He has been designated a “domestic terrorist” by the FBI.[6] Some anarcho-primitivist authors, such as John Zerzan and John Moore, have come to his defense, while holding some reservations about his actions and ideas.[7][8][9]

Early life
Kaczynski was born on May 22, 1942, in Chicago, Illinois, to second-generation Polish Americans Wanda (née Dombek) and Theodore Richard Kaczynski.[10] At six months of age, Ted’s body was covered in hives. He was placed in isolation in a hospital where visitors were not allowed, as doctors were unsure of the cause of the hives. He was treated several times at the hospital over an eight month period. His mother wrote in March 1943, “Baby home from hospital and is healthy but quite unresponsive after his experience.”[11]
From grades one through four, Kaczynski attended Sherman Elementary School in Chicago. He attended grades five through eight at Evergreen Park District 124 Schools.[12] As a result of testing conducted in the fifth grade, which determined he had an IQ of 167, he was allowed to skip the sixth grade and enroll in the seventh grade. Kaczynski described this as a pivotal event in his life. He recalled not fitting in with the older children and being subjected to their bullying. As a child, Kaczynski had a fear of people and buildings, and played beside other children rather than interacting with them. His mother was so worried by his poor social development that she considered entering him in a study for autistic children led by Bruno Bettelheim.[12]
He attended high school at Evergreen Park Community High School. Kaczynski excelled academically, but found the mathematics too simple during his sophomore year. Sometimes he would cut classes and write in his journal in his room. During this period of his life, Kaczynski became obsessed with mathematics, spending prolonged hours locked in his room practicing differential equations. Throughout secondary schooling Kaczynski had far surpassed his classmates, able to solve advanced Laplace transforms before his senior year. He was subsequently placed in a more advanced mathematics class, yet still felt intellectually restricted. Kaczynski soon mastered the material and skipped the eleventh grade. With the help of a summer school course for English, he completed his high school education when he was 15 years old. He was encouraged to apply to Harvard University, and was subsequently accepted as a student beginning in 1958 at the age of 16. While at Harvard, Kaczynski was taught by famed logician Willard Van OrmanQuine, scoring at the top of Quine’s class with a 98.9% final grade.
He also participated in a multiple-year personality study conducted by Dr. Henry Murray, an expert on stress interviews.[12] Students in Murray’s study were told they would be debating personal philosophy with a fellow student.[13] Instead they were subjected to a “purposely brutalizing psychological experiment”[13] stress test, which was an extremely stressful, personal, and prolonged psychological attack. During the test, students were taken into a room and connected to electrodes that monitored their physiological reactions, while facing bright lights and a two-way mirror. Each student had previously written an essay detailing their personal beliefs and aspirations: the essays were turned over to an anonymous attorney, who would enter the room and individually belittle each student based in part on the disclosures they had made. This was filmed, and students’ expressions of impotent rage were played back to them several times later in the study. According to author Alston Chase, Kaczynski’s records from that period suggest he was emotionally stable when the study began. Kaczynski’s lawyers attributed some of his emotional instability and dislike of mind control to his participation in this study.[13][14] Indeed, some have suggested that this experience may have been instrumental in Kaczynski’s future actions.[15]
Career

Kaczynski as a young professor at Berkeley, 1968
Kaczynski graduated from Harvard University in 1962, at age 20, and subsequently enrolled at the University of Michigan, where he earned a PhD in mathematics.[12] Kaczynski’s specialty was a branch of complex analysis known as geometric function theory. His professors at Michigan were impressed with his intellect and drive. “He was an unusual person. He was not like the other graduate students”, said Peter Duren, one of Kaczynski’s math professors at Michigan. “He was much more focused about his work. He had a drive to discover mathematical truth.” “It is not enough to say he was smart”, said George Piranian, another of his Michigan math professors. Kaczynski earned his PhD with his thesis entitled “Boundary Functions” by solving a problem[16]so difficult that Piranian could not figure it out.[17] Maxwell Reade, a retired math professor who served on Kaczynski’s dissertation committee, also commented on his thesis by noting, “I would guess that maybe 10 or 12 men in the country understood or appreciated it.”[18] In 1967, Kaczynski won the University of Michigan’s $100 Sumner B. Myers Prize, which recognized his dissertation as the school’s best in mathematics that year.[18] While a graduate student at Michigan, he held a National Science Foundation fellowship and taught undergraduates for three years. He also published two articles related to his dissertation in mathematical journals, and four more after leaving Michigan.[19]
In late 1967, Kaczynski became an assistant professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he taught undergraduate courses in geometry and calculus. He was also noted as the youngest professor ever hired by the university, but this position proved short-lived. Kaczynski received numerous complaints and low ratings from the undergraduates he taught. Many students noted that he seemed quite uncomfortable in a teaching environment, often stuttering and mumbling during lectures, becoming excessively nervous in front of a class, and ignoring students during designated office hours. Without explanation, he resigned from his position in 1969, at age 26. The chairman of the mathematics department, J. W. Addison, called this a “sudden and unexpected” resignation,[20] while vice chairman Calvin Moore said that given Kaczynski’s “impressive” thesis and record of publications, “He could have advanced up the ranks and been a senior member of the faculty today.”[21]
Montana

Kaczynski’s cabin at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
In mid-1969, Kaczynski moved into his parents’ small residence in Lombard, Illinois. Two years later, he moved into a remote cabin he built himself just outside Lincoln, Montana where he lived a simple life on very little money, without electricity or running water.[22] Kaczynski worked odd jobs and received financial support from his family, which he used to purchase his land and, without their knowledge, would later use to fund his bombing campaign. In 1978, he worked briefly with his father and brother at a foam-rubber factory,[18] where he was fired by his brother, David, for harassing a female supervisor he had previously dated.
Kaczynski’s original goal was to move out to a secluded place and become self-sufficient so that he could live autonomously. He began to teach himself survival skills such as tracking, edible plant identification, and how to construct primitive technologies such as bow drills.[3] However, he quickly realized that it was not possible for him to live that way, as a result of watching the wild land around him get destroyed by development and industry.[3] He performed isolated acts of sabotage initially, targeted at the developments near his cabin. The ultimate catalyst which drove him to begin his campaign of bombings was when he went out for a walk to one of his favorite wild spots, only to find that it had been destroyed and replaced with a road. About this, he said:
The best place, to me, was the largest remnant of this plateau that dates from the tertiary age. It’s kind of rolling country, not flat, and when you get to the edge of it you find these ravines that cut very steeply in to cliff-like drop-offs and there was even a waterfall there. It was about a two days hike from my cabin. That was the best spot until the summer of 1983. That summer there were too many people around my cabin so I decided I needed some peace. I went back to the plateau and when I got there I found they had put a road right through the middle of it… You just can’t imagine how upset I was. It was from that point on I decided that, rather than trying to acquire further wilderness skills, I would work on getting back at the system. Revenge.[3]
He began dedicating himself to reading about sociology and books on political philosophy, such as the works of Jacques Ellul, and also stepped up his campaign of sabotage. He soon came to the conclusion that more violent methods would be the only solution to what he saw as the problem of industrial civilization. He says that he lost faith in the idea of reform, and saw violent collapse as the only way to bring down the techno-industrial system.[3] Regarding his switch from being a reformer of the system to developing a means of taking it down, he said:
I don’t think it can be done. In part because of the human tendency, for most people, there are exceptions, to take the path of least resistance. They’ll take the easy way out, and giving up your car, your television set, your electricity, is not the path of least resistance for most people. As I see it, I don’t think there is any controlled or planned way in which we can dismantle the industrial system. I think that the only way we will get rid of it is if it breaks down and collapses … The big problem is that people don’t believe a revolution is possible, and it is not possible precisely because they do not believe it is possible. To a large extent I think the eco-anarchist movement is accomplishing a great deal, but I think they could do it better… The real revolutionaries should separate themselves from the reformers… And I think that it would be good if a conscious effort was being made to get as many people as possible introduced to the wilderness. In a general way, I think what has to be done is not to try and convince or persuade the majority of people that we are right, as much as try to increase tensions in society to the point where things start to break down. To create a situation where people get uncomfortable enough that they’re going to rebel. So the question is how do you increase those tensions?[3]
Bombings

An FBI reproduction of a bomb created by Kaczynski on display at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
Initial bombings
Kaczynski’s activities came to the attention of the FBI in 1978 with the explosion of his first, primitive homemade bomb. Over the next 17 years, he mailed or hand-delivered a series of increasingly sophisticated explosive devices that killed three people and injured 23 more.
The first mail bomb was sent in late May 1978 to materials engineering professor Buckley Crist at Northwestern University. The package was found in a parking lot at the University of Illinois at Chicago, with Crist’s return address. The package was “returned” to Crist, but when Crist received the package, he noticed that it was not addressed in his own handwriting. Suspicious of a package he had not sent, he contacted campus policeman Terry Marker, who opened the package, which exploded immediately. Marker required medical assistance at Evanston Hospital for his left hand.[23]
The bomb was made of metal that could have come from a home workshop. The primary component was a piece of metal pipe, about 1 inch (25 mm) in diameter and 9 inches (230 mm) long. The bomb contained smokeless explosive powders, and the box and the plugs that sealed the pipe ends were handcrafted from wood. In comparison, most pipe bombs usually use threaded metal ends sold in many hardware stores. Wooden ends lack the strength to allow significant pressure to build within the pipe, explaining why the bomb did not cause severe damage. The primitive trigger device that the bomb employed was a nail, tensioned by rubber bands designed to slam into six common match heads when the box was opened. The match heads would burst into flame and ignite the explosive powders. When the trigger hit the match heads, only three ignited. A more efficient technique, later employed by Kaczynski, was to use batteries and heat filament wire to ignite the explosives faster and more effectively.[24]
The initial 1978 bombing was followed by bombs sent to airline officials, and in 1979 a bomb was placed in the cargo hold of American Airlines Flight 444, a Boeing 727 flying from Chicago to Washington, D.C. The bomb began smoking, forcing the pilot to make an emergency landing. Some passengers were treated for smoke inhalation. Only a faulty timing mechanism prevented the bomb from exploding. Authorities said it had enough power to “obliterate the plane.”[23]
As bombing an airliner is a federal crime in the United States, the FBI became involved after this incident and derived the code name UNABOM (UNiversity and Airline BOMber). U.S. Postal Inspectors, who initially had the case, called the suspect the Junkyard Bomber because of the material used to make the mail bombs. In 1979, an FBI-led task force that included the ATF and U.S. Postal Inspection Service was formed to investigate the case. The task force grew to more than 150 full-time investigators, analysts, and others. This team made every possible forensic examination of recovered components of the explosives and studied the lives of victims in minute detail. These efforts proved of little use in identifying the suspect, who built his bombs essentially from “scrap” materials available almost anywhere. The victims, investigators later learned, were chosen irregularly from library research.
In 1980, chief agent John Douglas, working with agents in the FBI’s Behavioral Sciences Unit, issued a psychological profile of the unidentified bomber which described the offender as a man with above-average intelligence with connections to academia. This profile was later refined to characterize the offender as a neo-Luddite holding an academic degree in the hard sciences, but this psychologically based profile was discarded in 1983 in favor of an alternative theory developed by FBI analysts concentrating on the physical evidence in recovered bomb fragments. In this rival profile, the bomber suspect was characterized as a blue-collar airplane mechanic.[25] A 1-800 hotline was set up by the UNABOM Task Force to take any calls related to the Unabomber investigation, with a $1 million reward for anyone who could provide information leading to the Unabomber’s capture.[26]
Casualties
The first serious injury occurred in 1985, when John Hauser, a graduate student and Captain in the United States Air Force, lost four fingers and vision in one eye.[27] The bomb, like others of Kaczynski’s, was handcrafted and made with wooden parts.[28]
Hugh Scrutton, a 38-year-old California computer store owner, was killed in 1985 by a nail-and-splinter-loaded bomb placed in the parking lot of his store. A similar attack against a computer store occurred in Salt Lake City, Utah on February 20, 1987. The bomb, which was disguised as a piece of lumber, injured Gary Wright when he attempted to remove it from the store’s parking lot. The explosion severed nerves in Wright’s left arm and propelled more than 200 pieces of shrapnel into his body. Kaczynski’s brother, David—who would play a vital role in Ted’s looming capture by alerting federal authorities to the prospect of his brother’s being involved in the Unabomber cases— sought out and became friends with Wright after Ted was detained in 1996. David Kaczynski and Wright have remained friends and occasionally speak together publicly about their relationship.[29]
After a six-year break, Kaczynski struck again in 1993, mailing a bomb to David Gelernter, a computer science professor at Yale University. Though critically injured, Gelernter eventually recovered. Another bomb mailed in the same weekend was sent to the home of Charles Epstein from the University of California, San Francisco, who lost multiple fingers upon opening it. Kaczynski then called Gelernter’s brother, Joel Gelernter, a behavioral geneticist, and told him, “You are next.”[30] Geneticist Phillip Sharp at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology also received a threatening letter two years later.[31] Kaczynski wrote a letter to The New York Times claiming that his “group”, called FC, was responsible for the attacks.
In 1994, Burson-Marsteller executive Thomas J. Mosser was killed by a mail bomb sent to his North Caldwell, New Jersey home. In another letter to The New York Times Kaczynski claimed that FC “blew up Thomas Mosser because […] Burston-Marsteller [sic] helped Exxon clean up its public image after the Exxon Valdez incident” and, more importantly, because “its business is the development of techniques for manipulating people’s attitudes.”[32] This was followed by the 1995 murder of Gilbert Murray, president of the timber industry lobbying group California Forestry Association, by a mail bomb addressed to previous president William Dennison, who had retired.[31]
In all, 16 bombs—which injured 23 people and killed three—were attributed to Kaczynski. While the devices varied widely through the years, all but the first few contained the initials “FC”. Inside his bombs, certain parts carried the inscription “FC”, which Kaczynski later asserted stood for “Freedom Club”. Latent fingerprints on some of the devices did not match the fingerprints found on letters attributed to Kaczynski. As stated in the FBI affidavit:
203. Latent fingerprints attributable to devices mailed and/or placed by the UNABOM subject were compared to those found on the letters attributed to Theodore Kaczynski. According to the FBI Laboratory no forensic correlation exists between those samples.[33]
One of Kaczynski’s tactics was leaving false clues in every bomb. He would make them hard to find deliberately to mislead investigators into thinking they had a clue. The first clue was a metal plate stamped with the initials “FC” hidden somewhere (usually in the pipe end cap) in every bomb.[33] One false clue he left was a note in a bomb that did not detonate which reads “Wu—It works! I told you it would—RV”.[34] A more obvious clue was the Eugene O’Neill $1 stamps used to send his boxes.[35] One of his bombs was sent embedded in a copy of Sloan Wilson’s novel Ice Brothers.[23]
The FBI theorized that Kaczynski had a theme of nature, trees and wood in his crimes. He often included bits of tree branch and bark in his bombs. Targets selected included Percy Wood, Professor Leroy Wood Bearson and Thomas Mosser. Crime writer Robert Graysmith noted “In the Unabomber’s case a large factor was his obsession with wood.”[36]
List of bombings
Date Location Victim(s) Injuries
May 25, 1978 Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois Terry Marker, University Police Officer Minor cuts and burns
May 9, 1979 Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois John Harris, graduate student Minor cuts and burns
November 15, 1979 American Airlines Flight 444 from Chicago to Washington, DC (explosion occurred in midflight) Twelve passengers treated for smoke inhalation
Smoke inhalationJune 10, 1980 Lake Forest, Illinois
Percy Wood, President of United Airlines
Cuts and burns over most of body
October 8, 1981 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah None, bomb successfully defused None
May 5, 1982 Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee Janet Smith, University secretary Severe burns to hands and shrapnel wounds to bodyJuly 2, 1982 University of California, Berkeley
Diogenes Angelakos, Engineering professor Severe burns and shrapnel wounds to right hand and face
May 15, 1985 University of California, Berkeley
John Hauser, graduate student Loss of four fingers on right hand and severed artery in right arm, partial loss of vision in left eye
June 13, 1985 Auburn, Washington None, bomb successfully defused None
November 15, 1985 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
James V. McConnell, psychology professor, and Nicklaus Suino, research assistant McConnell: temporary hearing loss; Suino: burns and shrapnel woundsDecember 11, 1985 Sacramento, California Hugh Scrutton, computer store owner Death (first fatality)
February 20, 1987 Salt Lake City, Utah Gary Wright, computer store owner Severe nerve damage to left arm
June 22, 1993 Tiburon, California Charles Epstein, University of California geneticist Severe damage both eardrums resulting in total hearing loss, lost parts of three fingers
June 24, 1993 Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut David Gelernter, computer science professor Severe burns and shrapnel wounds, permanent damage to right hand and right eye
December 10, 1994 North Caldwell, New Jersey Thomas J. Mosser, advertising executive Death (second fatality)
April 24, 1995 Sacramento, California Gilbert P. Murray, timber industry lobbyist Death (third fatality)
References:[37][38]Industrial Society and Its Future
In 1995, Kaczynski mailed several letters, including some to his former victims and others to major media outlets, outlining his goals and demanding that his 50-plus page, 35,000-word essay Industrial Society and Its Future, abbreviated to “Unabomber Manifesto” by the FBI,[39] be printed verbatim by a major newspaper or journal. He stated that if this demand were met, he would then end his bombing campaign.[40] The document was a densely written manifesto that called for a worldwide revolution against the effects of modern society’s “industrial-technological system”.[41][42] There was a great deal of controversy as to whether the document should be published. A further letter threatening to kill more people was sent,[43] and the United States Department of Justice, along with FBI Director Louis Freeh and Attorney General Janet Reno, recommended publication out of concern for public safety and in hopes that a reader could identify the author. Bob Guccione of Penthouse volunteered to publish it, but Kaczynski replied that, since Penthouse was less “respectable” than the other publications, he would in that case “reserve the right to plant one (and only one) bomb intended to kill, after our manuscript has been published.”[44] The pamphlet was finally published by The New York Times and The Washington Post on September 19, 1995.[45][46]Penthouse never published it.[47]
Throughout the manuscript, produced on a typewriter without the capacity for italics, Kaczynski capitalizes entire words in order to show emphasis. He always refers to himself as either “we” or “FC” (Freedom Club), though there is no evidence that he worked with others. Donald Foster, who analyzed the writing at the request of Kaczynski’s defense, notes that the manuscript contains instances of irregular spelling and hyphenation, as well as other consistent linguistic idiosyncrasies (which led him to conclude that it was indeed Kaczynski who wrote it).[48]
Industrial Society and Its Future begins with Kaczynski’s assertion that “the Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race.”[49] The first sections of the text are devoted to discussion of the psychology of various groups—primarily leftists (a group he defines, in part as “hat[ing] science and rationality [paragraph 18 of his manuscript]”)—and of the psychological consequences for individual life within the “industrial-technological system”,[49] which has robbed contemporary humans of their autonomy, diminished their rapport with nature, and forced them “to behave in ways that are increasingly remote from the natural pattern of human behavior.” The later sections speculate about the future evolution of this system, arguing that it will inevitably lead to the end of human freedom, call for a “revolution against technology”, and attempt to indicate how that might be accomplished.[50]
Political and social views
In his opening and closing sections, Kaczynski addresses Leftism as a movement and analyzes the psychology of leftists, arguing that they are “True Believers in Eric Hoffer’s sense” who participate in a powerful social movement to compensate for their lack of personal power. He further claims that leftism as a movement is led by a particular minority of leftists whom he calls “oversocialized”:
The moral code of our society is so demanding that no one can think, feel and act in a completely moral way. […] Some people are so highly socialized that the attempt to think, feel and act morally imposes a severe burden on them. In order to avoid feelings of guilt, they continually have to deceive themselves about their own motives and find moral explanations for feelings and actions that in reality have a non-moral origin. We use the term “oversocialized” to describe such people.[51]
He goes on to explain how the nature of leftism is determined by the psychological consequences of “oversocialization”. Kaczynski “attribute[s] the social and psychological problems of modern society to the fact that society requires people to live under conditions radically different from those under which the human race evolved and to behave in ways that conflict with the patterns of behavior that the human race developed while living under the earlier conditions.” He further specifies the primary cause of a long list of social and psychological problems in modern society as the disruption of the “power process”, which he defines as having four elements:
The three most clear-cut of these we call goal, effort and attainment of goal. (Everyone needs to have goals whose attainment requires effort, and needs to succeed in attaining at least some of his goals.) The fourth element is more difficult to define and may not be necessary for everyone. We call it autonomy and will discuss it later.[52] […] We divide human drives into three groups: (1) those drives that can be satisfied with minimal effort; (2) those that can be satisfied but only at the cost of serious effort; (3) those that cannot be adequately satisfied no matter how much effort one makes. The power process is the process of satisfying the drives of the second group.[53]
Kaczynski goes on to claim that “[i]n modern industrial society natural human drives tend to be pushed into the first and third groups, and the second group tends to consist increasingly of artificially created drives.” Among these drives are “surrogate activities”, activities “directed toward an artificial goal that people set up for themselves merely in order to have some goal to work toward, or let us say, merely for the sake of the ‘fulfillment’ that they get from pursuing the goal”. He argues that these surrogate activities are not as satisfactory as the attainment of “real goals” for “many, if not most people”.[54]
He claims that scientific research is a surrogate activity for scientists, and that for this reason “science marches on blindly, without regard to the real welfare of the human race or to any other standard, obedient only to the psychological needs of the scientists and of the government officials and corporation executives who provide the funds for research.”[55]
Kaczynski developed his philosophical ideas early in life, and up to the moment of the bombings, carried on an extensive on-going debate with his brother David. Ted identified strongly with positivism, meaning that he strongly believed in an objective reality and that through sensory experience and analysis of this, one can obtain authentic knowledge. David, on the other hand, embraced more emotional and subjective philosophies, showing an interest in mystical, religious and emotional ideas. The two brothers did however share two beliefs: a fondness for the outdoors; David also lived in the wilderness for some time, and developed animosity toward “the system” (or state).[56] Kaczynski, both very much of his time (the 1960’s, deconstructivism, a distrust of “the system”, a desire for revolution) also remained “the intellectual outsider” and considered himself more important than others.[57]
Perceived control methods
As mentioned above, the result of the “disruption of the power process” is the primary cause of various maladies in society (e.g. crime, depression, etc.). Kaczynski maintains that rather than recognizing that humans currently live in “conditions that make them terribly unhappy,” “the system” (i.e. industrial society) develops ways of controlling human responses to the overly stressful environment in which they find themselves.
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